You are viewing snoots75

snoots75

May. 15th, 2011

12:49 am - Trip to Maryland, part 2

This is everything else I did on my April trip to visit my mom in Carroll Co., Maryland. Lots of graving and a little of this & that.

Our day out in Woodlawn had been bright & sunny, the rest of the week was a bit blah. Our second big day of graving involved 2 stops.
Lake View Memorial Park is a really horribly boring place, but since my grandparents & great-grandparents are buried there I go. I don't get to visit them too often. Here I am visiting their graves
Photobucket
We also visited my other granddad's cousin Peggy, who helped me out with a lot of genealogy stuff
Photobucket

We headed to the Last Supper section
Photobucket

No one ever bothered to clue me in til recently that one of my great-granddad's sisters is buried there. We wandered around a bit aimlessly (finding stuff in memorial parks is a huge pain in the ass) til we found her
Photobucket

While we were looking for her, I was taken by surprise to find the grave of a girl I knew from high school. I knew she was dead just wasn't expecting to find her there.
Photobucket

Even by memorial park standards, the markers here are pretty standard & uninteresting. I finally find some hint of interesting personalization in the corner of a marker
Photobucket
and thought, wow, that's nice, must've been a really cool guy. And then I googled his name. Oh boy...I won't say what he did, but I doubt "everybody that knew him" would agree with those sentiments.
And some random geese
Photobucket

Then it was off to Ellicott City and Good Shepherd Cemetery, where we were on a mission to do something we'd never done before...mark a grave! The grave is of my Mom's cousin YoYo, who died in 2007 and has been in an unmarked grave. Mom is a regular visitor over there and decided to remedy the situation as best she could.
Here is the "Before" view of the grave
Photobucket
Mom assembling the marker
Photobucket
And the "After"
Photobucket
Photobucket
Much better!

I found my only Confederate veteran of the trip
Photobucket

and some other interesting/nice stones of a more recent variety
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'd never heard of this guy
Photobucket
but you can search on youtube & have a listen to some of his stuff if that's your sort of music

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=buzz+busby&aq=f

We also ran into this gentleman
Photobucket
whose wife is buried near YoYo. Him & my mom met at the cemetery right after his wife died and have bumped into each other now & again. While he went to visit his wife & YoYo, he got us out some scrapbooks he made about his wife for us to look at which was rather interesting.

The third big day of graving was closer to home. First stop was a real trip down memory lane because it is where I had my first solo graving adventures. It was the Ebenezer United Methodist Church Cemetery in Winfield
Photobucket
I could walk here from my childhood home. This was in the late 80s/early 90s. This was only the 2nd time I've been since 1994.
Civil war monument
Photobucket
and I was there looking for Civil War soldiers. Here are 4 who died in the war, including one from up here in New England
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

These are among the oldest stones there
Photobucket
Photobucket

And I loved the photo of the man on his tractor
Photobucket
Photobucket

From there it was off to the Taylorsville United Methodist Church Cemetery, another I visited when I was a kid
Photobucket
Photobucket

Mom trying out the graving thing
Photobucket

Photobucket
Photobucket

Stones like this aren't very common in Vermont, when I do find them, they don't have as much detail, so I enjoy seeing them in Maryland
Photobucket

Stopped to visit my high school home ec. teacher
Photobucket

The view from the back of the cemetery
Photobucket

We also stopped by Wesley Freedom United Methodist Church Cemetery in Eldersburg, another I'd been to as a kid.
Photobucket

Someone had listed on Find a Grave from a transcription, so I concentrated my photo taking efforts on stones from the last 20 years or so. For the most part, not terribly interesting, though I did love this one, clearly a fan of Edgar Allan Poe!
Photobucket

Last cemetery stop was the nearby Johnsville United Methodist Church Cemetery. This is a black church & cemetery, and I'd never been there before. It only dates back to the 1920s.
Photobucket
Photobucket

And this is EVERYTHING ELSE...

Winfield Elementary, where I attended 4th & 5th grade.
Photobucket
It bears little resemblance to when I was there. They tore down the old part (dated to the 1930s) where I had my classes and now it's all new looking and boring.

Nearby, we also stopped by South Carroll High School, where I graduated in 1993.
This part is all new, it's for the arts I think.
Photobucket
The front doors through which I passed every day for 4 years
Photobucket
The lobby where I used to hang out with my friends before school
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

The Little George's convenience store near my childhood home in Winfield. One of the very few things still there unchanged from my growing up years
Photobucket
Photobucket
Went in and got me some Hershey's Ice Cream & some Martin's potato chips (neither available where I live now).

The home on Gemini Drive in Eldersburg (right behind the Carrolltowne Mall) where I lived from 1980-84.
Photobucket

Here is me, my little sister and our great-grandmother outside the house at Easter many years ago. Note how big that tree has gotten in the picture above!


The last day I was there in was abnormally hot (mid-80s) and me and Mom are not fans of that sort of weather so it was off to do more mundane things...

Photobucket

Photobucket

And 2 other places from my childhood years, though they've both changed locations

Photobucket

Photobucket

And last but not least, I enjoyed hanging out with the Cookie dog, who is the nicest, most mellow dog on the planet. She is 13 now and has a bit of trouble getting around, but that's ok. We still had a good time!
Having a french fry
Photobucket
Making a tasty face to let me know it was good
Photobucket
Having a doggy cupcake (she got a bunch for her birthday which was not long before my arrival)
Photobucket

Resting & being cute
Photobucket
Photobucket

Enjoying the yard
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

And that concludes my trip to Maryland...I'm sure it won't be the last!

Current Mood: tiredtired

May. 14th, 2011

11:27 pm - Trip to Maryland, part 1

My trip to Maryland to visit my Mom in April was spent almost entirely in cemeteries. She has moved back to southern Carroll County where I grew up, and just like when I was growing up, there isn't much there to do.

The biggest day of graving was in Woodlawn, Baltimore County, where I could mix big cemeteries like we don't have in Vermont with finding assorted family members.

First stop, LORRAINE PARK CEMETERY. I didn't take as many pix as I wanted cos I was a bit overwhelmed by all the cool stuff.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I.O.H. stands for The Improved Order of Heptasophs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Improved_Order_of_Heptasophs

Some less flashy markers I liked/found interesting
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

This is the Elks plot
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
where I photographed all the markers, which were all flat. They went back to 1885, this was a typical one
Photobucket

There was also the very cool Knights of Pythias plot
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
where I found my only Civil War veteran of the day...where all they all hiding in a cemetery this size?!
Photobucket

Paid my respects to various family members, including my great-grandparents
Photobucket

and my great-great grandparents
Photobucket
Photobucket

Various small mausoleums
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
It's stained glass window
Photobucket

The highlight of the day was the big mausoleum. Every time I've been somewhere with a big old mausoleum it's always been locked. This was not.
Photobucket
Before going in, I found the actress Mildred Natwick in the annex
Photobucket

Inside me & my mom were just like WOAH! 4 floors of which we explored 3. Everything was marble, there was tons of stained glass, and we were apparently the only living people in the building.
Photobucket
Photobucket
Mom at the opposite end of the central hallway from me, taking in all the awesomeness
Photobucket
Stained glass, lots and lots of it, these are only a small sampling
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

Gigantic stained glass at the main stairwell
Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
Photobucket
The giant foam banana amused me
Photobucket

I also was able to fill my first mausoleum photo request
Photobucket

Here is a picture Mom took of me inside the mausoleum
Photobucket

Next time I go to Maryland we are definitely wanting to do a return trip to Lorraine Park!

Next up, and right next door, the GREEK ORTHODOX CEMETERY. It was a very quick trip, done for the purpose of filling a photo request, which was for this soldier
Photobucket

A few more I snapped quickly
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

And then it was off to our third stop of the day, nearby WOODLAWN CEMETERY. When I was a kid I used to tag along with my granddad to visit various family members (and because I liked cemeteries then, too) but it had been so long since I'd been there it was like I'd never been there before! So we had to get him on the phone and ask him where everyone was, but we were still confused so had to stop in the office. No wonder we didn't remember...the layout is totally weird. It looks like the cemetery ends but if you keep going through some woods you come out into the other part which is like a memorial park (as opposed to the main part, which is cool & old).
So we drove through the woods til we came to the giant cross
Photobucket

and visited my great-grandparents
Photobucket
and then went to the section across the way, and visited my great-great grandmother
Photobucket
Most memorial park markers show little imagination, IMO, but I did find these
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

The view from back there.
Photobucket

I didn't spend as much time in the old part of the cemetery (we were starting to run out of steam a bit) but here's a few...
Photobucket

This monument reflects the man's occupation
Photobucket

Neat little mausoleum
Photobucket

The man whose family is buried in this plot was a bank president
Photobucket
Photobucket

Imagine my surprise, doing some research once I'd got back to Vermont, that his son-in-law was from right here in my town of Rutland!
Photobucket

His father and at least 2 of his brothers are buried here! Kinda neat to make a connection across 400+ miles.

This soldier died in WWI
Photobucket
Photobucket

My mom had pulled the car up next to this little mausoleum
Photobucket
and it was time to go. I hopped in the car, looked over to say something to her and could see straight into the mausoleum. And hopped right back out of the car!!! I've never seen stained glass like it in any mausoleum

Photobucket

I knew there had to be a story there, and you can read about Annetta and her stained glass portrait on her Find a Grave memorial here

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=dull&GSmid=4661415&GRid=69051939&

In the course of looking for that info, I discovered her father, a Baltimore druggist, got himself into a lot of legal trouble about 100 years ago...the papers dubbed him "The Cocaine King of Baltimore"...

And that was my day of graving in Woodlawn, Maryland. Everything else in a separate post!

May. 1st, 2011

05:58 pm - Loyalty Day Parade, Rutland, Vermont

The 2011 Loyalty Day Parade, Rutland, Vermont, photographed from Wales Street, May 1, 2011.

What is Loyalty Day?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loyalty_Day

And without a lot of additional commentary from me, here is some of the parade. Photos are in the order I took them.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket



Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket

Photobucket



Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket



Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

THE END.

Current Mood: impressedimpressed

Jan. 13th, 2011

11:24 pm - Rutland, Vermont Snow Photos

Rutland, Vermont
Jan. 13, 2011
Posted in the order taken

Nichols St.
Photobucket

Main St. Park
Photobucket

Up North Main St.
Photobucket

Main Street park again
Photobucket

Chaffee Arts Center
Photobucket

Main St. Park, Again!
Photobucket

Revolutionary War monument in Main St. Park
Photobucket

Rev. Samuel Williams house,  built in late 1700s (originally one story), he co-founded the Rutland Herald & wrote
the first history of Vermont. House was once home to Charles Tuttle Bookstore.
Photobucket

Civil War monument in Main St. Park
Photobucket

Squirrels in Main St. Park
Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket

Photobucket

Vietnam Veterans Memorial completely covered in snow, Main St. Park
Photobucket


Christ the King Catholic Church
Photobucket

Houses along South Main St.
Photobucket

Houses on the quiet street behind the park
Photobucket

Washington St.
Photobucket

Random old house
Photobucket

Rutland Fire Dept.
Photobucket

Center St.
Photobucket

Rutland Historical Society, formerly the Nickwackett Fire Station
Photobucket

Grace Congregational Church
Photobucket

Grace Congregational Church & the Rutland Free Library
Photobucket

Center Street looking towards downtown at the bottom of the hill
Photobucket

Baptist Church & Court House
Photobucket

One of my Rutland dream houses
Photobucket

My other Rutland dream house, across from the library
Photobucket

Stopping into the library, Jody checking the free rack in the lobby
Photobucket

Piles of plowed snow from Grace Congregational Church parking lot in front of the Good Cents thrift store
Photobucket

West St.
Photobucket



Current Mood: coldcold

Nov. 17th, 2010

03:38 pm - Trip to Wallingford, Vermont

A couple weeks ago I got on the bus and headed a short distance south to the town of Wallingford. I got there pretty early and was there all day. First are some photos as I walked through town...some are kinda dark, but some of these I snapped on my morning walk out to the cemetery, and others were on the walk back at the end of the day.
The big "attraction" in Wallingford is The Boy with the Boot statue. Normally he'd be in this fountain

Photobucket



but I just missed him, as he's been put away until spring. But you can see him & read about him here

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/7827

That's outside the old Wallingford Inn, which is now apartments for old people

Photobucket




Wallingford's other claim to fame is being the boyhood home of Paul Harris, who founded the Rotary Club.

Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



Wallingford's churches
Congregational

Photobucket



Baptist

Photobucket



St Patricks

Photobucket



Other sights downtown

Photobucket



the library

Photobucket



Post office/market
Photobucket



Town Hall
Photobucket



Great old building housing a pub
Photobucket




Former Odd Fellows Hall, now a pizza place & thrift shop, took photos of the front & around the side

Photobucket



Photobucket



The Victorian Inn, looks like a very nice place to stay

Photobucket



The Old Stone Shop


Photobucket



Photobucket



Revolutionary War Memorial

Photobucket



and a small Veterans park

Photobucket



Photobucket



The Otter Creek runs through downtown

Photobucket



I love old houses, and there are quite a few nice ones along Main Street. Here are just a few.
This one had a sign on it saying 1752, there is no way in hell this house is that old. 1700s sure, but not that early!

Photobucket



1790

Photobucket



1805

Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



and some nice fall color

Photobucket



Most of my time in Wallingford was spent at the 2 cemeteries downtown. St. Patricks was smaller, and not all the interesting, I was there looking for a photo request & some Civil War veterans. Here are a couple of views.

Large cross in the center, taken from front of cemetery
Photobucket



And from the back looking forward
Photobucket




Had my cooler bag with me & had lunch up there though, sitting amongst the older graves, that was quite nice.
My main stop of the day was Green Hill Cemetery, which is directly in front of St. Patricks.


Photobucket



This place was awesome. Check out the pond & fountain

Photobucket



Now I had read at the library that this cemetery rose 120 feet from front to back. They weren't kidding!

View down the hill (I wasn't even all the way to the top yet)

Photobucket



View from the top!!!

Photobucket



Terraced hillside

Photobucket



The way the cemetery goes up the hill meant there were stairs (big & small) EVERYWHERE.

Photobucket



Needless to say by the end of the day, and for 2 days after, I was exhausted.

The only flat part of the cemetery was the oldest part at the bottom

Photobucket



where these dogs barked at me the entire time

Photobucket



An old family vault

Photobucket



Photobucket



and the only mausoleum. The front was sealed up, but there was a broken out window in the back. Being nosey I tried to get a picture, but it wouldn't come out

Photobucket



Some newer stuff

Photobucket




Photobucket



Two snazzy old-looking pre-need stones

Photobucket



Photobucket



And having both Virginian & Confederate ancestors, I thought this was very very awesome

Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



The "Patriots Mound", which has the graves of 8 Civil War soldiers & 1 from World War I

Photobucket



I was photographing that day not only for Find a Grave but also for Vermont in the Civil War. Found all but 3 veterans known buried at Green Hill, so I thought it was a pretty productive day. Here are 2 gravestones for soldiers who died in the Civil War

Photobucket



Photobucket



Footstone for a Navy sailor who died in 1919

Photobucket




This lady's name just amused me

Photobucket



A sign telling about the man buried there

Photobucket



This sign had the names & dates for the family buried there, which was odd, since they weren't particularly hard to read

Photobucket



Assorted nice old stones

Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket




Like everyone, I enjoy finding zinkers. They were very common when I lived in Rhode Island. Also found a lot in Maryland. They don't seem to have been very popular here. I rarely find them. At Green Hill, not only did I find a zinker, but I found a family plot full of them, with the central monument being the biggest & best I've ever seen!


Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



All the names on the big zinker had the a little planter zinker like this. Unfortunately everything growing out of them was a dead mess.

Photobucket



Side panels on the central monument
Photobucket



Photobucket



A view of the plot from the side, the small granite monuments in front are also part of this family, the most recent burial in the plot being 2003.
Photobucket



And there you go, my trip to Wallingford. As always, thanks for coming along :)

Current Mood: tiredtired

Oct. 24th, 2010

04:35 pm - Riverside Cemetery, Proctor, Vermont

Proctor's newest cemetery is Riverside, which dates to 1912. On my recent trip to town I photographed the whole thing (currently 578 people) & found it a very interesting experience because of all the different nationalities of people there (who came to Proctor to work in the marble industry).

The sign by the entrance
Photobucket

I have to say I found the layout a bit strange. The oldest graves are in the back facing away from the road (and facing the river) and there is this huge mostly empty gap, and then the more recent burials all facing the road. There is definitely lots of room left, which is good, as the other 2 cemeteries in town look to be just about filled up.

Photobucket

This is the part down at the back
Photobucket

where I found LOTS of stones written in foreign languages (thanks to all at Find a Grave who helped me with some of these!), here's just a sampling

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

also down in that area
Photobucket

Photobucket

old ceramic photo of a lady who lived from 1886-1926
Photobucket

an interesting "then & now" I was able to do, this is the aunt of another contributor
Photobucket

You can see the stone how it looked not long after she died on her memorial
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=jones&GSfn=isabelle&GSbyrel=in&GSdy=1913&GSdyrel=in&GSob=n&GRid=13473974&df=all&

She was buried there only a year after the cemetery opened.

A more recent burial down in the old part
Photobucket

he was in the Navy in WWII
Photobucket

and on the back
Photobucket

Another recent one
Photobucket

The Otter Creek flows past the back of the cemetery
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Walking back up towards the front new part
Photobucket

Some stones of a more religious nature
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Detail of a train
Photobucket

Certain members of my family may like this one
Photobucket

I've done 37000+ memorials for Find a Grave, and I think this is the first time I've ever added a name with no vowels!
Photobucket

Photobucket

This lady's epitaph made me laugh! That must've been some seriously awesome soup.
Photobucket

Photobucket

Fishing enthusiast
Photobucket

Photobucket

and a bit strange, but this man died in 1838 and was moved here in 1979 (why I don't know, someone didn't like him in their backyard?)
Photobucket

here is a photo of his original gravesite, which he selected, from a 1922 book about Proctor

Photobucket

I believe his is the oldest grave in Proctor. It is also interesting to note that he died before anyone buried at Riverside was even born! You can read about him at his memorial

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=southmayd&GSiman=1&GScid=2224662&GRid=60384890&

And that's all from my big day out in Proctor! Hope all who looked at the 2 posts enjoyed coming along with me!

Current Mood: hungryhungry

04:02 pm - Proctor, Vermont

On October 13 I hopped on the bus for an all day adventure in the nearby town of Proctor. My first stop was Riverside Cemetery, but I'll make a separate post about that.

After Riverside, I headed for town.

First stop was the library, where I found this plaque on a rock out front

Photobucket

the library
Photobucket

where I asked for directions to my next stop, and then after a short walk found myself at the old Proctor mansion

Photobucket

and right there on the lawn is the grave of Old Charley, Governor/Senator/Secretary of War Redfield Proctor's Civil War horse!
Photobucket

nice photo from 1922 book about Proctor
Photobucket

That's the 2nd Civil War horse I've found up here!
A short walk back in the direction from which I came, I found a really old mile sign that told me it was 6 miles back to Rutland
Photobucket

Proctor has a very nice bridge downtown built of marble
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

the view from each side of the bridge
Photobucket

Photobucket

I walked across the bridge and across this bridge
Photobucket

over the train tracks
Photobucket

Photobucket

and was in "downtown", which there's not much there really. Up on the hill, the Union church
Photobucket

The post office & I'm not sure what else is in this building
Photobucket

Next to that, the fire dept.
Photobucket

OMYA
Photobucket

Town offices, but a long time ago this was a school
Photobucket

View back up the street
Photobucket

Across from all these buildings is a very nice little park
Photobucket

I sat at one of these tables
Photobucket

and had my lunch I brought with me
Photobucket

behind me was this war monument. It lists all the Proctor people who have died in wars from WWI to the present wars
Photobucket

After lunch I headed over to the Vermont Marble Museum on the other side of the park, stopping first to take a picture of this sign by the parking lot
Photobucket

and then went inside
Photobucket

Here is a link to their website
http://www.vermont-marble.com/index.php

I didn't take too many pictures, but here are a few
The Hall of Presidents
Photobucket

and just a few of the Presidents (including Vermont's two, of course!)
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Some plaster models & various work tools
Photobucket

Different military headstones they produce
Photobucket

There was an exhibit on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (work of the VT Marble Co.)
Photobucket

Mostly it was just photographs
Photobucket

Photobucket

here is a close up of one
Photobucket

and the original blue print of the tomb
Photobucket

I also watched a brief 15 minute movie about the Tomb which told a little history & showing the changing of the guards.

Back outside, another building I'm guessing is somehow related to the VT Marble Co. that is across the street.

Photobucket

From there, I walked back from the direction I came, back over the railroad tracks, back over the marble bridge and up South Street to the 2 cemeteries side by side there.

St Dominics Catholic Church, built in the 1920s
Photobucket

and across the street, St Dominics Cemetery
Photobucket

I thought this was a good picture, I was standing towards the back
Photobucket

I didn't spend too long there, but this was by far my favorite gravestone I saw there
Photobucket

Next I headed next door to South Street Cemetery in search of photo requests & Civil War veterans
Photobucket

The Proctor family plot & mausoleum. 4 Vermont Governors are here (father, 2 sons & grandson) & of course this is also who the town is named after.
Photobucket

Photobucket

It's pretty impressive. There's some sort of mesh screen stuff over the glass so I could barely make out the inside (room for 6) & definitely couldn't get a clear photo. It was nice though.

This lady was the sister of First Lady Lucretia Garfield
Photobucket

The Partridge plot, including Frank Partridge, a diplomat & very briefly serving US Senator

Photobucket

a few other random stones
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Lots of these little stones, bearing mostly foreign sounding names
Photobucket

and a couple other views
Photobucket

standing at the back, you can see the Proctor mausoleum in the distance
Photobucket

Making a separate post for Riverside Cemetery cos I did the whole thing!

Current Mood: coldcold

Jul. 20th, 2010

11:34 pm - Manchester Center, Vermont

Back on May 18th, I went on my last out of town graving trip until fall. Saw Find a Grave photo requests backing up at Factory Point Cemetery in Manchester Center, and since I'd never been to that one, figured it gave me a good reason to go. Hubby came along to, which is the first time he's ever done an out of town trip with me.

Got the bus down to Manchester for a dime (normally $2) because of some special week long thing they were having trying to get folks to use public transportation. Got off in front of the Rite Aid & it was a short walk to Factory Point.

Photobucket

Its about 220 years old & is maintained by the town. It is kept REALLY nice! The oldest part near the front, almost nothing down or broken, I couldn't believe it. Job well done to the folks that keep it looking that way!

Photobucket

Here are a few other views. Nice views of the mountains from the cemetery.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Hubby helping hunt down photo requests. We found 13/20, not too bad.

Photobucket

There was a little Civil War plot, which caught my interest. There were only 4 veterans in it though.

Photobucket

I did find quite a few other veterans scattered throughout the cemetery though, and also this soldier who was killed at Gettysburg.

Photobucket

Some stones from the old section

Great old epitaphs:
Photobucket
Tho' greedy worms devour my skin
And gnaw my wasting flesh
When God shall build my bones again
He'll cloath them all afresh.

Photobucket
Farewell my friends
prepare to die
For die you must
as well as I.

and similar but more wordy
Photobucket
Behold and see as you pass by
As you are now so once was I
As I am now so you must be
Prepare to die and follow me

The born in Cranston, Rhode Island was what caught my eye (I used to live in Providence)
Photobucket
but it also turns out Capt. Briggs son was a Governor of Massachusetts! Some interesting reading by the Governor about his father here:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=briggs&GSiman=1&GScid=104004&GRid=52909725&

A few other random old stones
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Not quite so old

This is a rather unusual looking one for around here
Photobucket

And a lot of the old marble stones were really white. I don't know how they were so white, if someone did something to them or if they were just really high quality but I have never seen so much old marble look so new

Photobucket

I loved this one!
Photobucket

Not so old stones...
Hubby made me take a picture of this one
Photobucket
Another more well known Robert Frost is buried about 30 miles south of Manchester in Bennington.

Photobucket

And a rather unusual stone
Photobucket

Photobucket

But the find of the day was this one!
Photobucket
I took the photo because I like that particular style, and also it was among the very oldest there. I have a habit of googling the names of the people I find in my travels & sometimes turn up the unexpected. It turns out Rachel is one of New Englands "vampires"! It's a load of nonsense, she wasn't really a vampire, but back then people in New England took it pretty seriously.

The following about Rachel was written by local Judge John S. Pettibone (1786 —1872)

"She [Rachel Harris Burton] was, to use the words of one who was well acquainted with her, “a fine, healthy, beautiful girl.” Not long after they were married she went into a decline and after a year or so she died of consumption. Capt. Burton after a year or more married Hulda Powel, daughter of Esquire Powel by his first wife. Hulda was a very healthy, good-looking girl, not as handsome as his first wife. She became ill soon after they were married and when she was in the last stages of consumption, a strange infatuation took possession of the minds of the connections and friends of the family. They were induced to believe that if the vitals of the first wife could be consumed by being burned in a charcoal fire it would effect a cure of the sick second wife. Such was the strange delusion that they disinterred the first wife who had been buried about three years. They took out the liver, heart, and lungs, what remained of them, and burned them to ashes on the blacksmith’s forge of Jacob Mead. Timothy Mead officiated at the altar in the sacrifice to the Demon Vampire who it was believed was still sucking the blood of the then living wife of Captain Burton. It was the month of February and good sleighing. Such was the excitement that from five hundred to one thousand people were present. This account was furnished me by an eye witness of the transaction."

And that was our trip to Factory Point Cemetery.
Since we don't get out of town much, we also made sure to spend a little time walking around.
First we had to have lunch. Graving is hard work! So it was off to McDonald's, where we hit the dollar menu.
Me
Photobucket
Hubby excited about his apple pie
Photobucket

The falls/river in Manchester Center
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

Why he wanted his picture taken pointing at this sign I have no clue. We don't live in or particularly near any of those places.
Photobucket

He also told me to take a picture of this pig
Photobucket

Jody visits bookstore shocker!!!
Photobucket

And if you like books & are ever in southern Vermont, you gotta visit the Northshire. It's pretty awesome!

http://www.northshire.com/

Weird Thomas Jefferson metal sculpture thats been out front as long as I can remember
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

View of "downtown"
Photobucket

We stopped in the country store (not a real country store, total tourist place)
Photobucket

and I loaded up on gummy frogs
Photobucket

A couple churches
the Baptist church
Photobucket

and Zion Episcopal Church
Photobucket

We stopped in the local convenience store, got some drinks & started back on the ridiculously long walk to the bus...why is it the bus drops one off in Manchester Center once a day & never comes back?!? Half an hour walk to get a bus back home. I was pretty dead by the time we got back to Rutland but still, it was a fun & productive day out.

Current Mood: lazylazy

May. 10th, 2010

10:15 pm

Recently I made a visit to the town of Poultney to visit the 2 cemeteries downtown. A little about Poultney

http://www.poultneyvt.com/

Not many pictures of town as I was only there 4 hours, but am hoping to do something a bit more thorough around town in the fall...might even walk all the way out to East Poultney!
So, before I post my graving pix, here's a little around town...

Two views of Main Street
The large building at the opposite end of the photo is Green Mountain College
Photobucket

Photobucket

Visitors Center
Photobucket

with stream beside it
Photobucket

Tiny movie theater!

http://www.tinytheater.biz/

I'd like to go sometime just to see what it's like in there!
Photobucket


The Methodist Church
Photobucket

and the Welsh Presbyterian Church, the area had a large Welsh population who worked in the slate industry
Photobucket

Old school turned into apartments
Photobucket

and
Photobucket

Very nice campus, this is only a little bit of it

Photobucket

Photobucket

http://greenmtn.edu/

I've been to Poultney before, but had never perused the cemeteries in town, so that was my main purpose of this trip. The 2 cemeteries in town are right next to each other. The first was St. Raphael Cemetery, which belongs to St. Raphael Catholic Church

Photobucket

A long walk down a path by the church & finally came to the gates

Photobucket

Photobucket

Dates to the late 1800s, and to be honest, not an overly interesting cemetery, and the weird way they laid out the footstones was confusing/annoying. Here's a few things I liked though...

One of the few statues, it was one of the oldest monuments there
Photobucket

Photobucket

Finds like this amuse me
Photobucket

See the cross up there?
Photobucket

here it is, for a local WWI soldier. The local American Legion post was named for him.
Photobucket

And once I made it up there, THE VIEW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Best view I've had on a cemetery trip in Vermont, hands down!!!

Next door is Poultney Cemetery, and there is no fence between the 2 of them, and once I figured out where the boundaries were, I wandered back & forth between the 2 all morning. Definitely enjoyed Poultney Cemetery more though.

This is the main gate
Photobucket

inside of which is the oldest section
Photobucket

and the road in that area is lined by these weird trees, what the hell are these?!
Photobucket

A few other cemetery views...
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Tallest monument in the cemetery
Photobucket

with a close-up of the statue on top
Photobucket

Another statue
Photobucket

A rare zinker find!
Photobucket
I don't know why there aren't many here, I found them everywhere in Rhode Island & quite a few in Maryland. Even in Evergreen in Rutland, biggest cemetery in the county, I haven't seen any. So was happy to find this one.

In the oldest section, I found this. Its for 2 little girls who died in the 1840s & is not in the best shape anymore.
Photobucket

Somewhat similar, but a lot more recent
Photobucket

One of the nicest stones for a Civil War casualty I've seen up here
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

A bit of family tree info
Photobucket

Welsh language
Photobucket

Like nearby Fair Haven, which I also recently visited, lots of Welsh folks came to Poultney. The cemetery was full of Welsh names.

and wrapping it up with a few more recent stones...

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
(Ernie is still out there enjoying life, according to his gravestone)

And that's it, my trip to Poultney. Thanks for coming along with me!

Current Mood: busybusy

Apr. 27th, 2010

10:49 pm - Fair Haven, Vermont Graving

The other day I made a rare trip out of town to Fair Haven, which is right on the border with New York. Ran out of time & energy so not a lot of pix of town, but I did make it to 2 cemeteries.

I got off the bus at the park in the middle of town, and these are pretty much the only pix of downtown I took...
Gazebo in the park
Photobucket

G.A.R. cannon
Photobucket

Historical marker, I always gotta take pictures of those!
Photobucket


also, right there on the park are 2 of my favorite houses I've ever seen anywhere. They are HUGE and made of marble!
The bigger one
Photobucket

and the other one
Photobucket
and from behind
Photobucket

If I ever win the lottery, that's what I want!

And onto cemetery #1, which was St. Mary's. It was a very short walk from the park.
Photobucket

The big industry in the area was SLATE.
Photobucket

To learn more about the slate industry in the area, check out this website
http://www.slatevalleymuseum.org/

I'm always on the look out for Civil War soldiers, and this one caught my eye because I once lived in Frederick
Photobucket
This is actually a cenotaph, since he was buried at Antietam National Cemetery.

A priest & his parents
Photobucket
close-up
Photobucket

and a bench
Photobucket

and a tiny chair
Photobucket


Didn't spend a lot of time there, because my next destination was quite a walk south of downtown, so I set off in that direction.
Crossed a bridge over the Castleton River
Photobucket
and the view from the other side of the bridge
Photobucket

New York, so close, and without a car, so far away!
Photobucket
Still have to go graving in NY some day.

Across the train tracks
Photobucket

and down the at the end of a quiet residential street, I came to the gates of Cedar Grove Cemetery

Photobucket

which is the main cemetery in town & a pretty good size (for Vermont).
Photobucket

Photobucket

I was so excited that it had the sections clearly marked! I had copied a map at the library, but to have the sections marked was so much easier. First time I've seen that here.
Photobucket

Think this was being used for storage
Photobucket

and a mausoleum. Couldn't see in, and the window on the back had a board over it.
Photobucket

A stone pre-dating the cemetery (which dates to 1870ish I think)
Photobucket

The G.A.R. cannon back up the page...it was for J.H. Bosworth post #53. Look who I found...
Photobucket

Large Welsh population in the area. They worked in the slate industry. I saw several stones written in Welsh (& wow were there a lot of folks named Jones!)
Photobucket

I always like this style of stone
Photobucket

A favorite old epitaph
Photobucket

Remember me as you pass by
As you are now, so once was I
As I am now, so you must be
Prepare for death and follow me.


A local soldier who unfortunately was killed in Iraq
Photobucket

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GSvpid=4661415&GRid=12092544&

Some more recent stones I liked

Photobucket

A Dead Head!
Photobucket


Right inside the gate I saw this massive stone with writing all over it
Photobucket

It was hard to photograph everything on it, but I did my best. Never seen a stone quite like it before.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

on the back, Mr. & Mrs. Coulman. He did very well for himself in the slate business, and it would also seem he was a very religious man.

Photobucket

Photobucket

and last but not least, I'm sure some of the folks who've been on the forum a long time remember Char, who unfortunately passed away a couple years ago. Guess what? Didn't realize it until I got home but I visited her Dad

Photobucket

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GScid=103940&GRid=5892706&

Small world!
And from Cedar Grove I walked back to town

Photobucket

and waited for the bus to take me back to Rutland.
Thank you for coming along on my trip with me :)

Current Mood: goodgood

Navigate: (Previous 10 Entries)